Category Archives: Photography Tutorials

TUTORIAL: Color Space {Sneak Peek Into ‘Skin Deep’}

I get it! Understanding color space is not a walk in the park, but I am here to hopefully demystify it a bit.. If you work in Lightroom: You are working in a ‘Prophoto RGB’ colorspace called Melissa RGB by default. It is what Lightroom uses because of it’s ability to encompass a full range…

4 comments
Add a comment...

Your email is never published or shared. Required fields are marked *

  • MichelleMay 15, 2015 - 1:50 pm

    Thank you for this tutorial and screenshots of your settings! This post is timely in that I’ve recently been trying to understand color space!
    I have a similar process to yours: edit in prophoto and then convert to sRGB upon final save. I understand ProPhoto is a larger color space than sRGB. But if the only purpose of my photos is for printing or to share online (what else is there?)… why do I bother to edit in prophoto at all if it the only time it will be seen that way is in my own LR catalog? Why not edit in sRGB from the beginning? Am I missing something?ReplyCancel

    • Summer CatesMay 16, 2015 - 11:12 am

      Hi Michelle! That’s a great question, and one I had been asked before, so I put it to the test! I imported a RAW image into LR, made one adjustment for WB, moved into PS in ProPhoto RGB, converted to sRGB and saved.
      Then, I opened the same RAW image in ACR {in an sRGB colorspace} made the same adjustment for WB and opened in PS CC. I saved the image in the same folder as the LR image and did a comparison.

      The result: The image edited in ProPhoto RGB colorspace was richer in color, where the sRGB final image looked almost stripped of color.

      The thinking is similar to that of editing in RAW as opposed to JPEG. We want to give our digital images their best fighting chance to ‘survive’ the editing process by working in the LARGEST colorspace available for as long as possible before converting to profile.ReplyCancel

      • MichelleJune 2, 2015 - 10:37 pm

        Oh wow thank you so much!! I never thought to test it like that! That makes sense and is a perfect way to explain it. I really appreciate you taking the time 🙂ReplyCancel

  • Michelle Harris IngramMay 15, 2015 - 5:45 pm

    Thank you for this tutorial and screenshots of your settings! This post is timely in that I’ve recently been trying to understand color space!
    I have a similar process to yours: edit in prophoto and then convert to sRGB upon final save. I understand ProPhoto is a larger color space than sRGB. But if the only purpose of my photos is for printing or to share online (what else is there?)… why do I bother to edit in prophoto at all if it the only time it will be seen that way is in my own LR catalog? Why not edit in sRGB from the beginning? Am I missing something?ReplyCancel

  • KristinJune 5, 2015 - 2:52 pm

    I’m kind of confused! You set up your external editing preferences to Open in Photoshop, but you still export the file and then open them in Photoshop? Or you go directly from lightroom to photoshop?

    Thanks!!!ReplyCancel

Starting out with Film | Tutorial by Gretchen Willis

Shooting film is my zen. I love hearing the shutter click, and that sexy sound of the film advancing. It’s more than just the sound of the camera, though. Shooting film is all about slowing down… knowing I just have a finite number of frames to capture my vision… carefully choosing my composition and lighting….

5 comments
Add a comment...

Your email is never published or shared. Required fields are marked *

  • Kim PetersonApril 14, 2015 - 11:27 am

    Love this, Gretchen!!! I wish I could have read it a month or two ago before I shot my first roll lol. It answers all the questions I had then. Your images are absolutely gorgeous too!!ReplyCancel

  • Julie KiernanApril 14, 2015 - 11:30 am

    Gorgeous work! As you’ve shown, film captures light so beautifully. I love shooting film for many of the same reasons.ReplyCancel

  • Léa Lebrun JonesApril 14, 2015 - 3:27 pm

    lovely post Gretchen!ReplyCancel

  • Summer CatesApril 14, 2015 - 4:47 pm

    Thank you for this, and these images are stunning!ReplyCancel

  • Sarah Anne KiblerApril 14, 2015 - 5:37 pm

    This is great! I love that you gave a simple explanation about, why film? in addition to the connection and love for the camer – “The benefit of shooting film is that, when it’s exposed correctly, the images will have near-perfect white balance and will handle highlights and shadows much better than their digital counterparts.”ReplyCancel

  • soniaApril 14, 2015 - 6:37 pm

    This is fantastic, thank you for sharing your journey! Definitely some of the same reasons I started shooting film. Great idea using consumer film first before exploring pro film. The cost definitely adds up!ReplyCancel

  • Lauren Humphreys EckardApril 14, 2015 - 6:37 pm

    I love it Gretchen! Great read!ReplyCancel

  • LaurenApril 14, 2015 - 7:04 pm

    I waited all day to read this! I loved every word of it… it completely resonated with me. Thanks for sharing all your wisdom and your beautiful photos. 🙂ReplyCancel

  • Jill Camacho QuashApril 14, 2015 - 9:56 pm

    Great read!! Thanks for posting this. Your photos are gorgeous!ReplyCancel

  • Ginny TuckerApril 14, 2015 - 10:20 pm

    So inspirational! What a wonderful post.ReplyCancel

  • Ziona BothmaApril 15, 2015 - 9:18 am

    Thank you, Gretchen. That really helped me understand ‘pushing’ and ‘pulling’ film and why it’s done. I have the gear, but also the fear and literally took 1 shot and haven’t picked up my camera again, but this really helped. Sometimes you just need someone else to explain it for it to click 😉ReplyCancel

  • Gracie Blue DinwiddieApril 15, 2015 - 2:00 pm

    Great post and gorgeous photos 🙂ReplyCancel

TUTORIAL: Setting Up Pinterest for Your Business

In addition to our websites/blogs, and other social media outlets such as Facebook, Pinterest is making a name for itself in the way of business. Setting up a Pinterest Business Account {and getting your website verified} will give your SEO {search engine optimization} a jolt, because Pinterest is rich in ‘google juice.’ I recently met…

no comments
Add a comment...

Your email is never published or shared. Required fields are marked *

TUTORIAL: DIY Gallery Wall

I have gotten a lot of comments and inquires about this DIY gallery wall that I recently put up. Because of that, I thought I would put a tutorial together for all of you. Hands down, this has been the easiest (I did it all by my lonesome) and the cheapest gallery wall to date….

no comments
Add a comment...

Your email is never published or shared. Required fields are marked *

Photo Editing for anyone and everyone | Tutorial by Gretchen Willis

Photo Editing – for anyone and everyone! Photographers spend a lot of money on gear, but that’s not the only place our money goes! We also spend a lot of money on software to get the images we shoot to express the vision we have in our minds. If I were writing this blog post…

no comments
Add a comment...

Your email is never published or shared. Required fields are marked *

  • Courtney RustMarch 10, 2015 - 2:55 pm

    Great article!ReplyCancel

  • Nadeen FlynnMarch 12, 2015 - 3:18 pm

    Fantastic, Gretchen!ReplyCancel

  • Mary JordanMarch 14, 2016 - 5:17 pm

    check out this site. I learned how to edit my photos in 2 hours! >>fb.me/2y4SdQvjB
    It is very cool! )ReplyCancel

Adding Textures to a Photo | Tutorial by Nadeen Flynn

Adding Textures to a Photo Have you ever wanted to apply a texture to an image, but just weren’t sure how to go about it? I’ll give you some simple steps to add that little bit of something extra. I am working on a Mac using Adobe PS CS6. You will need to have Photoshop…

no comments
Add a comment...

Your email is never published or shared. Required fields are marked *

Sketching Yourself into a Photo | Tutorial by Joel Robison

Sketching Yourself into a Photo Hello and welcome to this short tutorial on how to turn yourself into half-person and half-drawing! I’ve always loved drawing, sketching and illustrating and when I started photography I realized that there were opportunities for me to combine both the drawing that I loved and the photography that I loved…

no comments
Add a comment...

Your email is never published or shared. Required fields are marked *

Using your Speedlight | Tutorial by Adeena Pentland

Speedlights are scary!! At least, that’s what a lot of people think. But honestly, once you play with it a little bit, you will find that they can help enhance the available natural light in your home. Especially if it’s a tiny, dark house in Canada.  😉 For instance, let’s do some real-life “normal day”…

no comments
Add a comment...

Your email is never published or shared. Required fields are marked *

  • Allison Fay ChewningDecember 4, 2014 - 3:40 pm

    Love this tutorial! I always stress about using a seedlight.ReplyCancel

  • Jan JohnsonDecember 4, 2014 - 4:39 pm

    thank you for showing us how the different positions of your flash affected the look of the images. very helpful!ReplyCancel

  • Sabra McKibbonDecember 4, 2014 - 5:35 pm

    You summed it up nicely–speedlights are SCARY. O.o I may finally have the courage to purchase and use one now, thanks, Adeena!ReplyCancel

  • Kerry VarnumDecember 4, 2014 - 11:30 pm

    I need to learn my speed light. (I say that every year at about this time!)ReplyCancel

  • Dana Schaeffer StavanaDecember 5, 2014 - 1:40 am

    Thank you! I am so intimidated by my speedlight. I must take it out and play againReplyCancel

  • Donna DavieDecember 5, 2014 - 2:17 am

    Thank-you for this post Adeena! I really need to let my speedlight out of the box and learn how to use it.ReplyCancel

  • Kate DensmoreDecember 5, 2014 - 3:30 am

    I loved this! You make it seem so approachable. Thank you SO much!!!ReplyCancel